Starting a family can change the atmosphere of your house and turn it into a home. With a little one crawling or running around, you may bask in his or her little chuckles and funny faces as he or she enjoy him or herself. Now, as the summer nears, you may be anxiously awaiting to move playtime outdoors, and what better place than a new salt system right in your backyard?

If you don’t already have one in place, now is the perfect time to get one, and Phoenix pool service is ready to help you with the management that goes along with a new salt system to keep it fully functional for years to come. Once it’s installed, it’s time to introduce your little one to his or her new favorite activity – swimming.

Introducing your baby to the water
With a young child, you may be wondering what the right age is to teach your son or daughter how fun splashing around can be. The good news is that babies can take their first dip at 6 months. Although you may be anxious to show your baby your own pool, first, you may want to attend a parent-and-child swimming class through your town’s recreation department. This session is great for socializing your child with other adults and babies.

For these classes, you’ll need to bring a warm bottle for after the swim if your baby still bottle feeds or a snack if he or she already eats solid foods, as the activity will most likely make your little one hungry! Also, you won’t want to forget towels for both you and your baby – there are even some baby towels that have hoods attached to them – as well as a couple of bath toys to make the atmosphere fun and relaxing, a changing mat and a diaper bag.

Once he or she becomes comfortable in the water – in your arms, of course – you can try it at home in your own salt system. This will put your son or daughter on the right track to enjoy the pool and be ready to take formal swim lessons once he or she is developmentally ready – usually at age 3 or 4.

What’s beneficial about splashing around in your own pool is that you don’t have to worry about crowds, which are often present at public pools. Lots of people may upset your child, making the experience more difficult to enjoy.