When you were a kid, chances are you got plenty of lecturing from your parents. From “Don’t talk to strangers!” to “Say please and thank you!” there’s a lot your folks probably told you about when it came to staying safe and being polite. For example, did your parents ever tell you not to go swimming for at least 30 minutes after eating?

Parents everywhere have been warning their kids about the dangers of swimming after eating for years, and because of this, lots of kids have missed out on valuable swimming time! But we did a little research to find out if there’s any truth behind this theory, and the good news is, there’s no reason why you and your family can’t have fun in the pool after scheduling Fort Worth pool service – even after indulging in a delicious backyard barbeque.

The theory
According to MedicineNet.com, the notion that swimming on a full stomach will result in cramps and eventual drowning has been circulating for decades. People thought that the digestive process would require a lot of the body’s blood to aid in digestion, and not enough blood would be left to keep arms and legs functioning properly. This would supposedly lead to cramps that would make swimming difficult and maybe even impossible.

The truth
While it’s true that some blood goes toward the digestive process after a meal, there’s definitely still plenty left to keep your arms and legs moving through the water. Sure, a minor cramp is possible, but in that instance, it’s easy enough to get out of the pool and wait until the pain subsides, or just take it easy and slow down.

Of course, eating a big, heavy meal with lots of carbohydrates and protein can make anyone uncomfortably full, which isn’t the best state to be in when you want to splash around in your new salt system. You might want to wait a bit before jumping in if you’re feeling too full to be able to swim around comfortably, but you’ll probably still be able to enjoy floating around on an inflatable raft! Otherwise, it’s perfectly safe for anyone to use your pool after a meal, as long as there’s a responsible adult present to keep an eye on everyone.